AFRICAN ENERGY CHAMBER (AEC) BRINGS TO PORTUGAL’S AFRO NATION FESTIVAL THE MESSAGE OF A JUST ENERGY TRANSITION AND SUPPORT FOR OIL & GAS

AFRICAN ENERGY CHAMBER (AEC) BRINGS TO PORTUGAL’S AFRO NATION FESTIVAL THE MESSAGE OF A JUST ENERGY TRANSITION AND SUPPORT FOR OIL & GAS

The African Energy Chamber (AEC) is taking part in Afro Nation, the world’s largest Afro beats festival, mobilising thousands of Africans and the African diaspora to advocate for a just energy transition and to defend Africa’s right to use fossil fuels. The AEC, as the voice of the African energy sector and a strong advocate for Africa’s socioeconomic development, will travel to Afro Nation to promote the role of young people in Africa’s energy future.

Africa’s human capital is unparalleled, as it has the world’s fastest-growing population as well as the youngest population. With the continent’s energy future largely determined by its young population’s ability to mobilise and drive investment and development across the continent’s oil and gas sectors, the AEC will engage with a diverse range of people at the festival, advocating for a just transition in Africa led by the youth. Afro Nation provides the AEC with a unique opportunity to directly discuss the challenges and opportunities facing Africa’s energy sector, while also promoting the role of youth in defining a future centred on Africa’s needs.

The story is simple: Africa requires and deserves to develop its oil and gas resources. Africa’s young people are both the continent’s and the African energy industry’s future, and as such, they must advocate for the development of these resources in order to eliminate energy poverty by 2030, ushering the continent into a new era of socioeconomic success. The AEC delegation, led by Executive Chairman NJ Ayuk, will be promoting lower taxes and support for energy investors, kicking off project developments, and supporting the work of energy companies such as Eni, which invests in Ivory Coast, Mozambique, and Congo; TotalEnergies, which develops gas in Mozambique, Namibia, and South Africa while developing the East African Crude Oil Pipeline; and ExxonMobil, as they continue to explore Africa and produce low-carbon hydrocarbons. Young Africans and the diaspora must drive the narrative of Africa in Western countries.

“Young Africans represent the future of Africa, and it is important that we have enabling environments for the youth to start and grow businesses in Africa. Energy poverty is real, and the AEC is honored to have an opportunity to make the case for Africa at the Afro Nation festival. We want to have a lot of young people involved in making energy poverty history and African Energy Week in Cape Town. We are considering a Just Energy Transition Concert on October 17, 2022, in Cape Town with various African artists,” Ayuk started.

He added that, “As far as I’m concerned, new oil and gas discoveries are promising developments for African countries, communities, businesses, entrepreneurs, African diaspora and young people hoping to build bright futures for themselves.”

Each of Africa’s recent discoveries has the potential to lead to well-paying jobs, the development of valuable new skills, gas for domestic gas-to-power programmes, and much more. As a result, economic development, investment, and job creation for young Africans and the diaspora are all critical. Africa has an advantage on the global stage in this regard: a young population. If we empower our youth, they will end energy poverty, reject aid, embrace free enterprise, and defeat the xenophobia, sexism, and homophobia that still plague our communities. However, we must empower them through education that focuses on a just energy transition.

The AEC believes that Africa will not succeed unless the people are trained and motivated to participate. Successful African entrepreneurs can serve as mentors, and African businesses can make a difference by providing young people with internships where they can develop the soft skills required for business success. Due to a lack of investment in fossil fuels, many of the young people at the Afro Nation festival will be forced to leave our continent’s riches in the ground – or be labeled an environmental enemy. The end result? Jobs that should and might otherwise be available to young Africans are as insignificant, dispersed, and increasingly out of reach as dust on a breezy day.

 

Source: Energy Ghana

ENERGY GHANA MAGAZINE

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